Four Railway Stations on new Irish Stamps

An Post have issued four new stamp designs, featuring Dundalk, Cork, Heuston and Bagenalstown Stations (see Journal.ie for details). There is an error in the Journal’s article in that the station at Dundalk featured on the stamp did not open until 1893 – the 1849 date is for the earlier D&BJR station which was to the south of the present station.

New Lock for the Lagan

The Lisburn Star reports that work is underway on a new footbridge and lock on the River Lagan, which, according to the paper “is part of a larger programme of work to open up the Lagan Navigation, linking in with other reinvigorated waterway systems throughout Ireland and opening up the waterway, which first opened in 1763, to Lisburn and eventually Lough Neagh.”

I wonder how they plan to deal with the motorway? Mind you, as Jeffrey Donaldson is a patron of the Lagan Navigation Trust, perhaps this is where part of the DUP’s £1bn is going.

Roșia Montană mining firm hit with retaliatory fine

I was on an organised IH trip of Romania last year and one of the locations visited was Roșia Montană, a site of historic mining remains. The village was a former shadow of itself as a Canadian mining firm had commenced the process of buying out the villagers to establish a modern mine in the area.

Thus far, they have not succeeded in doing so and the Guardian reports that the Romanian authorities have slapped a $8.6m tax bill on the company after the latter lodged a compensation claim over the failure to be allowed commence mining.

A reference book to the Incorporated Railway Companies of Ireland 1847

I started reading this pdf version downloaded from Google (one of the millions that they have scanned) to see if there is any new nugget of information therein.

On the first page it states:

“In 1832, an Act for a line of 25 miles, called the Belfast and Cavehill, was obtained, which changed the title, in 1836, to the Ulster”.

With such a grievous error on the first page, I am not hopeful for the rest of the text.

Dargan rotated

We are all aware of the saying that such and such a person is rotating in their grave.

Whilst I am not sure what reason he would have to do so (although maybe the decline of the Irish railway network, notwithstanding the negative environmental impact of road traffic, would do it), the National Gallery in Dublin have undertaken a proxy for this and rotated his statue outside their building on Merrion Square by 90 degrees, such that it now faces Leinster Lawn.

WIlliam Dargan Original Position
WIlliam Dargan Original Position
William Dargan Statue
William Dargan New Position