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History Locations

St. Judes Spire, Inchicore

St. Judes Anglican Church in Inchicore, Dublin, was built between 1862 and 1864, primarily for the use of railway workers employed at the nearby Inchicore railway works.

The main building was dismantled and relocated to Straffan many decades ago, where it now acts as the Steam Museum, thanks to the actions of Robert Guinness.* I understand that Robert would have taken the spire as well, but local objections led to this being left, with dreams of some sort of taxpayer funded community centre being built around it.

The latter never happened and the spire and adjacent ground is now up for sale. The Spire is a protected structure and therefore, any planning permission granted for development would need to factor this in.

* Declaration of interest – I know Robert Guinness personally.

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History Locations

Inny Junction

Located on the Dublin – Sligo railway line between Multyfarnham and Edgeworthstown, Inny Junction was a passenger transfer point only – i.e. you couldn’t buy a ticket to Inny Junction – to allow for transfer to the Cavan branch of the MGWR. Opened in 1856, it closed in 1931, when the transfer point moved to Mullingar.

Below is the Googlemaps aerial view for the junction:

The junction point can be seen below mid centre in the image. However, what is interesting is the double line for trees just above this, now with a roadway immediately to the north. Such a feature is usually a dead give away of a former railway – however, clearly this is not the route of the railway.

Looking at the 25″ ordnance survey map online (not possible to embed), I note that the field boundaries are marked separately for the areas occupied by this feature, which would suggest a formal separation of this land area and not an accidental development.

Was the track at Inny Junction re-routed and if so, why?

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History

Dolphin’s Barn brickworks

Dublin City Council have an article on their website about the former Dolphin’s Barn brickworks.

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History

Carlisle Bridge, Dublin

RTE have an article on their site about Carlisle Bridge in Dublin – predecessor to O’Connell Bridge.

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History

The Bull Lighthouse, Co. Cork

RTE have archive footage about the lighthouse on The Bull off the Beara Peninsula in Co. Cork, which was taken in 1979. One of the ‘mod cons’ noted as available to the lighthousekeepers was a TV. I wonder did they have a TV licence?

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History

Carroll’s, Dundalk

RTE’s 100 Buildings series has an article about the Carroll’s tobacco factory in Dundalk.

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History

ESB Design/DUTC Flying Snail

RTE are running a series – 100 Buildings – which is a look at 100 features in Irish structures.

One of these articles looks at the building of electricity substations as part of the electrification of Ireland that followed the commissioning of the Ardnacrusha power station.

An interesting fact therein is that the ESB in house designer who produced the early ESB logo, which was a wave and thunderbolt design that can still be seen on some structures around the country, also worked as a freelancer and in this capacity, designed the flying snail logo for the Dublin United Tramway Company (which was retained by CIE upon its creation in 1945).

ESB old Logo, South Circular Road, Dublin 8.
ESB old Logo, South Circular Road, Dublin 8. Copyright Ewan Duffy 2021
Flying Snail Logo - Copyright Ewan Duffy 2022
Flying Snail Logo – Copyright Ewan Duffy 2022
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History

A look back at the Guinness Brewery

DublinLive.ie has a feature looking at the Guinness Brewery in the 1950s, including images of the building that is now the Storehouse.

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History

Poolbeg Chimneys

RTE is running a series on their website called “100 buildings“, which is a select look at 100 Buildings of 20th Century Ireland.

One of the structures featured is the Poolbeg Chimneys in Dublin.

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History

Arva Road Station

I was processing the photos I took last weekend and when doing those of Arva Road, I reckoned something was wrong and it was this photo that caused me concern:

Arva Road Goods area
Arva Road, Co. Cavan. Copyright Ewan Duffy 2021

My narrative of the station is that there was a single platform at the station on the Up side (right hand side). Clearly this photo shows two platforms. In addition, the station building, the roof of which can be seen left of centre, doesn’t really fit with the station building being on the right (it is clearly on the left).

Nowadays with the OS 25 inch maps online and available to view from the comfort of your home and without gatekeepers (it is unlikely I would have been able to produce the Gazetteer 15 years ago as the online resources did not exist), I was able to go back to map.geohive.ie to check out what the story was.

The image above is of the goods area at Arva Road, which was on the Up (right hand) side before the station. The single platform was beyond this (in the photo above, it would have been to the left of the station building).

Absent this map information, I would have assumed that Arva Road was a standard 2 platform station, as this is what it looks like on the ground.

There was also a goods store here, which would have been on the loading bank on the right. It has obviously been demolished.